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© 2023 by SOUTHERN ARIZONA COMMUNITY ACADEMY.  

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2470 North Tucson Boulevard

Tucson, Arizona 85704

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Tel:  520.319.6113

Fax: 520.319.6115

I AM A PROSPECTIVE...

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Enrollment numbers are used to create the master schedule. Parents and students need to understand the following limitations: 

 

● Some classes are only offered on-site, this will be noted in the course’s description. 

● Some classes may be may not always be available due to programmatic needs.  

 

Credit Transfer 

Southern Arizona Community Academy will accept the following credits from outside institutions: 

  • Credit granted from previously attended high schools 

  • Credit from CTE courses taken at Joint Technical Education District (JTED) or it's equivalent 

  • Dual enrollment credit from nationally or regionally accredited community colleges or universities. 

 

COURSE OF STUDY

The Southern Arizona Community Academy offers both the Arizona State Board of Education and the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) high school graduation requirements.  SACA provides a personalized academic program in language arts, literature, social studies, mathematics, natural sciences, and international languages. The SACA curriculum integrates  Arizona Academic High School Standards. SACA faculty focuses their instruction on the use of critical thinking, mastery learning, and technology. Learning is self paced with one-to-one instruction or in small groups. A personalized plan might include credit recovery options, accelerated studies, and dual college credit options dependent on the student’s individual needs.

 

Courses of Study: 

As an alternative high school students are expected to earn a minimum of 4.5 credits per year. In order to remain on track for graduation in four years it is recommended that students complete a minimum of three (3) credits per semester or six (6) credits per year. 

 

The personalized academic plan for each student will meet the high school graduation requirements of the State Board of Education:

 

All graduation requirements are strictly enforced by year of graduation, NOT by cohort.  Therefore all high school seniors that fail to meet graduation requirements will be required to complete all additional requirements that become effective as outlined in the State Board of Education Rule (AAC R7-302.01, 302.02, and 302.03) for the current graduation year.

 

Arizona State Board of Education High School Graduation Requirements are a minimum 22 credits.

  1. Four credits of English

  2. Three credits of Social Studies

    1. One credit of American history, including Arizona history;

    2. One credit of World History/Geography;

    3. One-half credit of American government, including Arizona government; and

    4. One-half credit of economics

  3. Four credits of Mathematics, including Algebra 2

    1. One credit of Algebra 1

    2. One credit of Geometry 

    3. One credit of Algebra 2

    4. One credit of “significant math content”

  4. Three credits of Science 

  5. One credit of Fine Arts or Career and Technical Education and Vocational Education

  6. Seven credits of approved additional courses (electives) to include coursework to meet Career and College Readiness Standards

 

The course of study for university-bound students is based on the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) entrance requirements of the college or university of the student’s choice. 

 

ABOR Tri-University Admission Standards

  1. Four credits of English

  2. Two credits of Foreign Language

  3. Three credits of Social Sciences

  4. Four credits of Mathematics

  5. Three credits of Science 

  6. One credit of Fine Arts

  7. Minimum three and one-half credits of approved electives

Creating your FUTURE (CYF) Class

Creating Your Future (CYF) Class

CYF includes the required Education & Career Action Plan (ECAP) - “Effective for the graduation class of 2013, schools shall complete for every student in grades 9-12 an Arizona Education and Career Action Plan” (R7-2-302.05). “An ECAP reflects a student’s current plan of coursework, career aspirations, and extended learning opportunities in order to develop the student’s individual academic and career goals” (Arizona Department of Education). Southern Arizona Community Academy students are expected to complete activities for their ECAP during their Creating Your Futures (CYF) class each semester. These activities are assigned and graded by the student's grade level mentor. Students use AzCIS (Arizona Career Information System) and the CYF class to keep track and build their ECAPs.

English Courses (grammar, composition, literary analysis)

4 YEARS/UNITS

Note:  English courses taken must include literature and substantial emphasis on grammar and composition.  Courses such as journalism, business communications, speech and any others not devoted exclusively to the study of English may not be substituted for an English course.

 

English 1A & 1B students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis.  Students edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts. Emphasis is placed on organizing logical arguments, clearly related definitions, theses, and evidence.  Students read from multiple genres including world literature, novels, poetry, and dramas.            

Credit Awarded: English 1A (0.5 credit), English 1B (0.5 credit)

English 1ACR & 1BCR are the credit recovery courses for English 1.

 

English 2A & 2B continues to increase and refine communication skills.  Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions.  They will edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts.  In English II students practice all forms of writing such as logical arguments, expressions of opinion, and personal forms of writing. These personal forms of writing may include a response to literature, a reflective essay, or an autobiographical narrative.  English II students read from multiple genres including world literature, novels, poetry, and dramas. Students interpret the possible influences of the historical context on literary work.

Credit Awarded: English 2A (0.5 credit), English 2B (0.5 credit)

English 2ACR & 2BCR are the credit recovery courses for English 2.

 

English 3A & 3B continues to increase and refine communication skills.  Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions.  They will edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts.  In English III, students practice all forms of writing such as business forms, reports, business memos, the narrative of procedure, the summary or abstract, and resume. English III students read from multiple genres including American literature, and other works of world literature.  Periods from American literature may include the pre-colonial period, colonial and revolutionary periods, romanticism and idealism, realism, naturalism, early 20th century, and late 20th century. Students interpret the possible influences of the historical context on literary work.

Credit Awarded: English 3A (0.5 credit), English 3B (0.5 credit)

English 3ACR & 3BCR are the credit recovery courses for English 3.

 

English 4A & 4B continues to increase and refine communication skills.  Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions.  They will edit their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English and produce final, error-free drafts.  In English IV students are expected to write in a variety of forms, including business, personal, literary, and persuasive texts. English IV students read from multiple genres including British literature, and other works of world literature.  Periods from British literature may include old English period, medieval and English renaissance, 17th century, 18th century, romantic period, Victorian period, modern, and postmodern period. Students interpret the possible influences of the historical context on literary work.

Credit Awarded: English 4A (0.5 credit), English 4B (0.5 credit)

English 4ACR & 4BCR are the credit recovery courses for English 4.

MATHEMATICS COURSES

4 YEARS/UNITS

Algebra I, II; geometry; and any advanced math course for which Algebra II is a prerequisite, e.g. pre-calculus, calculus, analytical geometry. 

 

Algebra 1A &1B is an introduction to and development of beginning algebra skills. Upon completion of this course, students will deepen their knowledge of how to set up and solve algebraic equations and inequalities including word problems, graph linear and nonlinear equations, interpret and describe functions and graphs, and analyze patterns.

Credit Awarded: Algebra 1A (0.5 credit), Algebra 1B (0.5 credit)

Algebra 1ACR & 1BCR are the credit recovery courses for Algebra 1.

 

Algebra 2A & 2B provides a review and extension of the concepts taught in Algebra 1. Upon completion of this course, students will deepen their knowledge of solving equations and inequalities, solving systems, matrices, and graphing and identifying key features. Students study quadratic equations, polynomial functions, radical functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, rational functions, quadratic relations and conic sections, trigonometric functions, sequences and series, standard deviation, the Binomial Theorem, the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, the Law of Sines, and the Law of Cosines. Students also will learn how to use a graphing calculator. Throughout this course, students will develop learning strategies, critical thinking skills, and problem-solving techniques to prepare for future math courses.

Credit Awarded: Algebra 2A (0.5 credit), Algebra 2B (0.5 credit)

Algebra 2ACR & 2BCR are the credit recovery courses for Algebra 2.

 

Calculus 1A & 1B students completing this course will be able to take the AP Calculus exam, enabling them to earn college credit for taking this course while still in high school. Besides learning how to use the basic tools of Calculus, students completing this course learn on a deeper level what they are really doing and why it works. This provides insight empowering students with the knowledge required to solve real world problems. 

Credit Awarded: Calculus 1A (0.5 credit), Calculus 1B (0.5 credit), On site only.

Calculus ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Calculus. On site only.

 

Geometry A & B is an introduction to and development of beginning geometry skills. Upon completion of this course, students will deepen their knowledge of inductive and deductive reasoning, proofs, applying theorems and postulates, measurement, construction, geometric similarities, triangle relationships, congruency, analyzing patterns, properties of polygons, and the connection between geometry and algebra.

Credit Awarded: Geometry A (0.5 credit), Geometry B (0.5 credit)

Geometry ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Geometry.

Other Math Courses

Financial Literacy A & B provides students with the tools to make wise financial decisions. Students learn how current financial decisions affect future financial options. Understanding credit scores, the danger of pay-check to pay-check living, and the principles behind banking is an important foundation taught in Financial Literacy. Students learn purchasing and spending skills as they look into price comparison and explore the many facets of sales and budgeting. Students are also introduced to investments and retirements to start thinking about their future, as well as credit card offers, payday loans, car title loans, personal loans, and student loans. Students evaluate offers and recognize misleading data, offers, and scams including pyramid schemes, phishing scams, modeling scams, work-at-home, and business opportunity scans, reloading phone call scams, travel telemarketing scams, lottery scams, fake check scams, charity, and fundraising fraud, and credit and loan phone scams. The course finishes with taxes: federal income, state income, sales tax, property tax, personal property tax, and other taxes and assessments. Financial Literacy reinforces basic math applications as they exist in everyday life.

Credit Awarded: Financial Literacy A (0.5 credit), Financial Literacy B (0.5 credit)

 

Math Models A & B Math Models student build on K-8 and Algebra 1 foundations using algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, to model information and to solve problems. Students will use mathematical methods to model and solve real-life applied problems involving money, data, chance, music, science, design, and building. Mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics will be used to solve problems in mathematical and non-mathematical situations. Justification, proof, and computation will also be used in problem-solving.

Credit Awarded: Math Models A (0.5 credit), Math Models B (0.5 credit)

 

Personal Finance A & B, an important aspect of every student’s future is the ability to plan and implement sound and responsible financial goals. The Personal Finance course will educate students in a variety of financial and monetary subjects, including the foundations of economics, preparing a budget, understanding paychecks and tax deductions, banking, and the importance of researching the quality of goods to make consumer choices. Lessons of similar topics have been grouped into units to provide smooth transitions from one lesson to the next.

Credit Awarded: Personal Finance A (0.5 credit), Personal Finance B (0.5 credit)

 

Precalculus A & B covers the concepts and skills necessary for students to succeed in calculus. This course contains in-depth coverage of trigonometry, logarithms, analytic geometry, and upper-level algebraic concepts. Students develop an understanding of matrices, proofs, statistics, functions, and the graphing calculator. Upon completion of this course, students will be fully prepared for calculus, advanced chemistry, and calculus-based physics.

Credit Awarded: Precalculus A (0.5 credit), Precalculus B (0.5 credit)

Precalculus ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Precalculus.

SCIENCE COURSES

3 Credits are required for high school graduation of which one must be biology. Biology, chemistry & physics are recommended for students planning to attend college.

 

Aquatic Science A & B (STEM), students will test, predict, and learn about water and aquatic ecosystems. They will look at water as a system and learn about its chemical properties. Students will learn about oceans and their effect on weather. They will also examine the properties of both freshwater and saltwater ecosystems and well as aquatic biology. Finally, they will look at present and future challenges including water pollution and water scarcity. 

Credit Awarded: Aquatic Science A (0.5), Aquatic Science B (0.5)

 

Astronomy: Exploring the Universe (STEM) offers students the opportunity to study the solar system, stars, galaxies, and interstellar bodies. This introduces and uses astronomical instruments and typically explores theories regarding the origin and evolution of the universe, space, and time.

Credit Awarded: (0.5) 

 

Biology A & B (STEM), students will develop an appreciation for the living world. A brief history of biology followed by an investigation of the basic unit of life—the cell—will prepare students for deeper research. Students will explore topics concerning genetics, including meiosis, heredity, and DNA. Students consider natural selection, origin of life theories, and the mechanics of evolution. An exploration of “little critters” such as bacteria precedes a study of plant structures, processes, and reproduction. Students will inquire into animal behavior and characteristics as they study invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, among others. An inspection of nutrition and disease will lead students to examine human body systems. The course will conclude with an analysis of the interdependence of living things in ecosystems. Throughout the course, there are lab investigations, including video labs, to reinforce science concepts and skills.

Credits Awarded: Biology A (0.5), Biology B (0.5)

Biology ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Biology.

 

Chemistry A & B (STEM), students use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: characteristics of matter; energy transformations during physical and chemical changes; atomic structure; periodic table of elements; behavior of gases; bonding; nuclear fusion and nuclear fission; oxidation-reduction reactions; chemical equations; solutes; properties of solutions; acids and bases; and chemical reactions. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives.

Credit Awarded: Chemistry A (0.5), Chemistry B (0.5)

Chemistry ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Chemistry.

 

Earth Science A & B (STEM), provides the basic foundations of scientific measurement skills, a comprehensive look at the way the Earth and all its layers are formed, and a complete overview of the solar system and its major components. Each lesson is designed to be the foundation for the next lesson in the course so that students are provided the best reinforcement of key terminology throughout their studies. Interactive media has been included to help engage the student in the visual learning process. This course is a course designed to provide a foundation for students to develop an understanding of the earth, its history, composition, formative processes, and an understanding of the universe. Students will develop an understanding of basic laws, theories, and models to explain the world.

Credit Awarded: Earth Science A (0.5), Earth Science B (0.5)

Earth Science ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Earth Science.

 

Integrated Physics & Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, & 8 is designed to introduce students to chemistry and physics. The course reduces normally complex science concepts to clearly understandable terms. Each lesson is presented as part of a drama through storytelling that unravels a great mystery about the development of science and the periodic table of elements. All 180 lessons of this course help students understand how scientists discovered each element and made advances in both chemistry and physics through the process of scientific inquiry.

Credit Awarded: (0.25) credit for each completed unit for a maximum of (2.0) credits.

 

Marine Science (STEM), through the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, and problem solving, students will conduct various scientific procedures that will lead to an increased level of knowledge about Marine Science. Students will also have the opportunity to use technology and laboratory instruments in an academic setting. By recognizing the inherent ethics and safety procedures necessary in advanced experiments, students will become progressively more confident in your abilities as a capable marine scientist.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Physics A & B (STEM), students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; force; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and quantum physics. This course provides students with a conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical and scientific skills.

Credit Awarded: Physics A (0.5), Physics B (0.5)

Physics ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for Physics.

 SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES

3 YEARS/UNITS

History and Social Science will minimally consist of one credit of American history, including Arizona history; one credit world history/geography; and one-half credit of government and one-half credit of economics.

 

Arizona State History A is designed to familiarize basic concepts of Arizona’s geography and the highlights of our state’s history. This course uses multiple means to compare and contrast different historical accounts of events in Arizona’s history.

Credit Awarded: (0.5), On site only.

 

Arizona State History B is an independent study course a student will complete an independent study of an Arizona history topic of personal interest and create a project that includes a presentation.

Credit Awarded: (0.5), On site only.

 

Economics with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits is the culmination of the economic content and concepts studied from Kindergarten through required secondary courses. The focus is on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the United States and a comparison with those in other countries around the world. Students will examine the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses. Students will analyze the interaction of supply, demand, and price and study the role of financial institutions in a free enterprise system. Types of business ownership and market structures will be discussed, as will be basic concepts of consumer economics. The impact of a variety of factors including geography, the federal government, economic ideas from important philosophers, historic documents, societal values, scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the national economy and economic policy will be an integral part of the course. Students will apply critical-thinking skills to create economic models and to evaluate economic activity patterns. Students will also examine the knowledge and skills necessary as self-supporting adults to make critical decisions relating to personal financial matters.

Credit awarded: (0.5)

Economics CR is the credit recovery course for economics.

 

Founding Fathers provides students with an overview of the founders of the United States and the history of the United States during the revolutionary period through the early history of the country, examining political, economic, social, philosophical, military, scientific, and cultural developments. 

Credit Earned: (0.5), On site only.

 

Honor Civics examines the general structure and functions of American systems of government, the roles and responsibilities of citizens to participate in the political process, and the relationship of the individual to the law and legal system often through discussions of current events and community-based projects.

Credit Awarded: (0.5) On site only.

 

U.S. Government, the focus will be on principles and beliefs upon which the United States was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. This course is the culmination of the civic and governmental content and concepts studied from kindergarten through required secondary courses. Students will learn major political ideas and forms of government in history. A significant focus of the course will be on the U.S. Constitution, its underlying principles and ideas, and the form of government it created. Students will analyze major concepts of republicanism, federalism, checks, and balances, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights and will compare the U.S. system of government with other political systems. Students will identify the role of government in the U.S. free enterprise system and examine the strategic importance of places to the United States. Students will analyze the impact of individuals, political parties, interest groups and the media on the American political system, evaluate the importance of voluntary individual participation in a democratic society, and analyze the rights guaranteed by the U.S Constitution. Students will identify examples of government policies that encourage scientific research and will use critical-thinking skills to create a project on a contemporary government issue.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

U.S. Government CR is the credit recovery course for U.S. Government.

 

U.S. History A & B, in this course, which is the second part of a two-year study of U.S. History that begins in Grade 8, students will study the history of the United States since Reconstruction to the present. Historical content will focus on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to industrialization and urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies of the Cold War and post–Cold War eras, and reform movements including civil rights. Students will examine the impact of geographic factors on major events and analyze causes and effects of the Great Depression. Students will examine the impact of the constitutional issues on American society, evaluate the dynamic relationship of the three branches of the federal government, and analyze efforts to expand the democratic process. Students will describe the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. Students will analyze the impact of technological innovations on the American labor movement. Students will use critical-thinking skills to explain and apply different methods that historians use to interpret the past, including points of view and historical context.

Credit Awarded: U.S. History A (0.5), U.S. History B (0.5)

U.S. History ACR & BCR are the credit recovery courses for U.S. History

 

World History A & B is the only course offering students an overview of the entire history of humankind. The major emphasis will be on the study of significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present. Traditional historical points of reference in World History will be identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world. Students will evaluate the causes and effects of political and economic imperialism and of major political revolutions since the 17th century. Students will examine the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and identify the historic origins of contemporary economic systems. Students will analyze the process by which democratic-republican governments evolved as well as ideas from historic documents that influenced that process. Students will trace the historical development of important legal and political concepts. Students will examine the history and impact of major religious and philosophical traditions. Students will analyze the connections between major developments in science and technology and the growth of industrial economics. They will use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of evidence.

Credit Awarded: World History A (0.5), World History B (0.5), 

World History ACR & BCR is the credit recovery course for World History.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES

French 1A & 1B are designed to introduce students to French language and culture, the course prepares students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. They introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking cultures.

Credit Awarded: French 1A (0.5), French 1B (0.5)

 

French 2A & 2B builds upon skills developed in French I, preparing students to communicate authentically in French by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. The French II course introduces the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of French-speaking cultures.

Credit Awarded: French 2A (0.5), French 2B (0.5)

 

German 1A & 1B is designed to introduce students to the German language and culture. The course emphasizes basic grammar and syntax, simple vocabulary, and the spoken accent so that students can read, write, speak, and understand the language at a basic level within predictable areas of need, using customary courtesies and conventions.

Credit Awarded: German 1A (0.5), German 1B (0.5)

 

German 2A & 2B course builds on the skills developed in German I, preparing students to communicate authentically in German by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. The German II course introduces the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of German-speaking cultures.

Credit Awarded: German 2A (0.5), German 2B (0.5)

 

Spanish IA & 1B course prepares students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on a variety of topics. They introduce the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures.

Credit Awarded: Spanish 1A (0.5), Spanish 1B(0.5)

 

Spanish IIA & IIB course builds upon the skills developed in Spanish I, preparing students to communicate authentically in Spanish by interpreting (reading, listening, viewing), exchanging (speaking and listening; reading and writing), and presenting (speaking, writing) information on concrete topics. The Spanish II course introduces the relationships among the products, practices, and perspectives of Spanish-speaking cultures.

Credit Awarded: Spanish 2A (0.5), Spanish 2B(0.5)

ELECTIVE COURSES

Academic Decathlon/Olympiad-Mathematics A & B, this course provides an opportunity for a student to prepare to compete in a mathematics competition.

Credit Awarded: Academic Decathlon/Olympiad-Mathematics, can be awarded in quarter credits, (0.25) or half credits (0.5). On site only.

 

Academic Decathlon/Olympiad-Science A & B (STEM), this course provides an opportunity for a student to prepare to compete in a mathematics competition.

Credit Awarded: Academic Decathlon/Olympiad-Science, can be awarded in quarter credits, (0.25) or half credits (0.5). On site only.

 

Archaeology: Detectives of the Past; The famous Spanish philosopher and writer George Santayana once said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." We know from studying history how true this statement is, and the age-old field of archaeology helps us to better understand, through discovery and analysis, how ancient civilizations have shaped the modern world. This course explores various techniques, methods, and theories of this field and illustrates how archaeologists conduct their studies. 

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Biotechnology: Unlocking Nature's Secrets (STEM), this course enables students to develop and expand their knowledge and skills in biology, physics, technology, and mathematics. Course content may vary widely, drawing upon diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, biomolecular genetics, bioprocess engineering, agricultural biology, or environmental engineering. Students may engage in problems related to biomechanics, cardiovascular engineering, genetic engineering, agricultural biotechnology, tissue engineering, biomedical devices, human interfaces, bioprocesses, forensics, and bioethics.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Concepts of Engineering & Technology (STEM), Through Concepts of Engineering & Technology, students learn how the momentum of science is continually propelling engineers in new directions towards a future full of insight and opportunity. This course explores the different branches of engineering and how problem-solving, sketching, collaboration, and experimentation can change and influence technology.

Credit Awarded: (0.5) 

 

Creative Writing course offers students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis of the courses is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Although most creative writing classes cover several expressive forms, others concentrate exclusively on one particular form (such as poetry or playwriting).

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Health Education course covers topics such as personal health (nutrition, mental health and stress management, drug/alcohol abuse prevention, disease prevention, and first aid) and consumer health issues. The course may also include brief studies of environmental health, personal development, and/or community resources.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

History of the Holocaust explores the harrowing details of anti-Semitism, the rise of the power of the Mazi party, the persecution of European Jews and other groups, and the tremendous aftermath for everyone involved in World War II.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Independent Research is a multidisciplinary course that enables students to develop fundamental knowledge of the steps in the research process. Students gain the ability to choose among research topics as they relate to various fields such as science, history, and literature. The course promotes research skills and students learn to evaluate research claims made in the media, literature, and other sources.

Credit Awarded: (0.5), On site only.

 

Introduction to Military Careers offers students the ability to explore far more career diversity than most people imagine in the military. Introduction to Military Careers will provide the information students need to gain a broader understanding of how to find the right fit. Students will learn about all of the branches of the United States military along with the numerous career fields for the military services.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Mythology and Folklore explorers legendary tales and how these famous anecdotes have helped humans make sense of the world. Beginning with an overview of mythology and different types of folklore, students will journey with age-old heroes as they slay dragons, outwit gods, defy fate, and outwit clever monsters. Students will explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore and see how these powerful tales continue to shape society even today.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

National Security allows students to have the opportunity to learn about the critical elements of a career field in National Security along will the risks that face our nation today. Students will explore evaluation of satellite data, current events, assessing military engagements, and other activities for analysis and exploration of this field and career choice.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Off-Campus Sports, these courses award physical education credit for off-campus sports activities such as swimming or weight training courses taken at a community center or community college.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

Personal Fitness course emphasizes the acquiring of knowledge and skills regarding lifetime physical fitness; content may include related topics such as nutrition, stress management, and consumer issues. Students may develop and implement a personal fitness plan.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Psychology A & B, through the study of psychology, students acquire an understanding of and an appreciation for human behavior, behavior interaction, and the progressive development of individuals. The course examines the nature of psychology as a social and behavioral science.

Credit Awarded: Psychology A (0.5), Psychology B (0.5)

 

Research/Technical Writing class prepares students to write research papers and/or technical reports. This class emphasizes researching (primary and secondary sources), organizing (material, thoughts, and arguments), and writing in a persuasive or technical style.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

The Lord of the Rings, in this literature course student, explores J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of The Rings" Trilogy, and its effect on the modern American Culture such as film and Tolkien's influence in the modern fantasy genre.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Theater/Cinema Course helps students understand the critical historical and stylistic elements of the theater & cinema. This course helps students form an aesthetic framework to examine social, political, and historical events in the world and to understand how moving images express the ideas of individuals and society. Course content may include analysis, discussion, and evaluation of multiple film styles including, but not limited to, documentary, short film, drama, horror, and comedy.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

World Religions: Exploring Diversity, students will explore the various characteristics of faith and introduce the fundamentals of the major religions, including Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Shintoism, and Taoism.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Joint Technical Education District (JTED)

JTED offers polytechnic programs to all Pima County high school students. Visit the district’s website to learn more: https://pimajted.org/. SACA students who participate in JTED are expected to have good attendance and to stay academically eligible at both schools. 

 

Occupational Programs

The following are representative of, but not limited to, the opportunities for occupational preparation available through Pima Community College, with students’ tuition paid by SACA.  A dual credit agreement between SACA and Pima Community College allows SACA students to earn community college credit as well as high school credit.

 

Business

♦Accounting Administration ♦Computer Science ♦Finance ♦Management ♦Marketing ♦Media Technology ♦Office Occupations

 

Health Occupations

♦Dental Assistant ♦Radiology Technology ♦ Emergency Medical Technology ♦ Nursing ♦ Lab Technology

 

Service Occupations

♦Law Enforcement ♦Fire Science ♦Hospitality ♦Library Media Specialist ♦Social Services

 

Technology and Trade Industrial

♦Air Conditioning & Refrigeration ♦Aviation & Aeronautics ♦Automotive Technology  ♦ Building & Construction ♦Commercial Art/Advertising Art ♦Drafting Technology ♦Environmental Technology ♦Engineering ♦Manufacturing ♦Machinist ♦Welding   ♦Electronics ♦Computer Technology


 

SACA Vocational Education  and Fine Arts Courses

Art Appreciation A & B, What makes an artwork a masterpiece? Why do artists create art? What is the difference between Rococo and Art Nouveau? In this course, students will discover the answers to these questions and more. We examine the elements of art and principles of design, and explore how artists have used these elements and principles in the creation of art for centuries.

Credit Awarded: Art Appreciation A (0.5), Art Appreciation B (0.5)

 

Art in World Cultures A & B, Who do you think is the greatest artist of all time? Maybe Leonardo da Vinci? Michelangelo? Maybe a more modern artist like Claude Monet or Pablo Picasso? Or is it possible that the greatest artist of all time is actually someone whose name has been lost to history? In Art in World Cultures, you’ll learn about some of the greatest artists in the world while creating your own art, both on paper and digitally. This course explores basic principles and elements of art and teaches you how to critique different art works art. And along the way, you will get to discover some traditional art forms from various regions of the world including the Americas, Africa, and Oceania.

Credit Awarded: Art in World Culture A (0.5), Art in World Culture B (0.5)

 

Coding 1A: Introduction to Programming (STEM), students learn about the influence of computers on our daily life, the purpose of programming languages, and how computers function. Experiment with Python to explore algorithms, syntax, and data structures while putting the software development cycle into practice by starting to plan and develop your own app in the Capstone Project. Discover the potential of a career in this field!

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Coding 1B: Programming (STEM),  Building on the prior prerequisite course, nurture your understanding of programming to take on new challenges! Discover a variety of development tools to create code while learning about methods for modular programming and coding structures. Explore security considerations, like encryptions, and toolkits to elevate your coding skills! Finally, start creating your own comprehensive software for the web and move through programming problems as part of the Capstone Project.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Forensic Science 1 (Secrets of the Dead)(STEM), this course offers the student the chance to dive into the riveting job of crime scene analysis. Students explore the techniques and practices applied during a crime scene investigation and how clues and data are recorded and preserved. Students will better understand how forensic science applies technology to make discoveries and bring criminals to justice.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Forensic Science 2 (Secrets of the Dead)(STEM), this course further develops the students the chance to dive into the riveting job of crime scene analysis. Students explore the techniques and practices applied during a crime scene investigation and how clues and data are recorded and preserved. Students will better understand how forensic science applies technology to make discoveries and bring criminals to justice.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Game Design 1 (STEM), prepares students to design computer games by studying design, animation, artistic concepts, digital imaging, coding, scripting, multimedia production, and gameplay strategies. Advanced course topics include, but are not limited to, level design, environment, and 2D/3D modeling, scene and set design, motion capture, and texture mapping.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Game Design 2 (STEM), further prepares students to design computer games by studying design, animation, artistic concepts, digital imaging, coding, scripting, multimedia production, and gameplay strategies. Advanced course topics include, but are not limited to, level design, environment and 2D/3D modeling, scene and set design, motion capture, and texture mapping.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Independent Study in the Performing  Arts- this is conducted with instructors or professional musicians/dancers/choreographers or other performing artists as mentors, enable students to explore a particular art or area of the Performing Arts. Independent Study courses may serve as an opportunity for students to expand their expertise in a particular form or style, to explore a topic in greater detail, or to develop more advanced skills.

Credit Awarded: (0.5) per semester 

 

Veterinary Science, The Care of Animals will introduce students to how to care for domestic, farm, and wild animals, along with the diagnosis of their common diseases and ailments. Students will be introduced to how different veterinary treatments are used and developed to improve the lives of animals and as a result the lives of those people who treasure them.

Credit Awarded: (0.5)

 

Workplace Experience course provides students with work experience in fields related to networking systems, hospitality, services, and or other occupations. Goals are typically set cooperatively by the student, teacher, and employer (although students are not necessarily paid). These courses may include classroom activities as well, involving further study of the field or discussion regarding experiences that students encounter in the workplace.

Credit Awarded: Credit may be awarded quarter (0.25) or half (0.5) credit increments.